Week 7: Digital Blurring

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Digital Blurring can be described by a phase in which technology can be used for personal/recreational purposes but also efficiently integrated into education environments to support learning (Howell, 2013). An example of this could be while I’m on pinterest looking (endlessly) through the pages of craft, travel, cooking or humour and I come across a great resource I could use within the classroom to use to help further my classroom topic or create a new topic around that resource.

Digital games can clearly consume the attention of children and adolescents. However, it is important to assess the extent that digital game technology had an impact on childhood education (Klopfer, Osterweil, & Salen, 2009, p. 7). Since video games have the capacity to engage children in learning experiences, this has led to the rise of “edu-tainment” media (Klopfer, Osterweil, & Salen, 2009, p. 9) . This type of media can be seen through a website called “Sploder”. Sploder can let the student imagine and create a digital game to save an upload to the site where other like minded gamers can access and play the game.

This weeks task was create a game using Sploder, as I am not an avid gamer (the last game I played was Mario Brothers on super Nintendo, those were the days!) I found if difficult to think of stimulating situations to get through which were hard enough but doable to complete each level. As a future educator I believe certain online games can be beneficial both inside and outside of the classroom and be a valid tool for engaging and connecting my students.

Here is my shot at Sploder:

http://www.sploder.com/publish.php?s=d0044y36

References

Howell, J. (2013). Teaching with ICT: Digital pedagogies for collaboration and creativity. South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press.</p>

Klopfer, E., Osterweil, S., & Salen, K. (2009). Obstacles, Opportunities & Openness. Moving Learning Games Forward, 1, 7-9.

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